Walt whitman pioneers. Walt Whitman: Poems “Pioneers! O Pioneers!” Summary and Analysis 2019-03-05

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Pioneers! O Pioneers! Poem by Walt Whitman

walt whitman pioneers

All the pulses of the world, Falling in, they beat for us, with the Western movement beat; Holding single or together, steady moving, to the front, all for us, Pioneers! Do the feasters gluttonous feast? Never must you be divided, in our ranks you move united, Pioneers! Yet a passing hour I yield you, in your tracks to pause oblivious, Pioneers! O I mourn and yet exult--I am rapt with love for all, Pioneers! O you young and elder daughters! Are there some of us to droop and die? These are of us, they are with us, All for primal needed work, while the followers there in embryo wait behind, We to-day's procession heading, we the route for travel clearing, Pioneers! Lo, the darting bowling orb! Lo, the brother orbs around, all the clustering suns and planets, All the dazzling days, all the mystic nights with dreams, Pioneers! All the pulses of the world, Falling in they beat for us, with the Western movement beat, Holding single or together, steady moving to the front, all for us, Pioneers! All the hapless silent lovers, All the prisoners in the prisons, all the righteous and the wicked, All the joyous, all the sorrowing, all the living, all the dying, Pioneers! The pioneers are described like an army detachment. Have the elder races halted? O I mourn and yet exult—I am rapt with love for all, Pioneers! Our speaker calls out to the pioneers. Till with sound of trumpet, Far, far off the daybreak call—hark! O I mourn and yet exult, I am rapt with love for all, Pioneers! Was the road of late so toilsome? O my aches with love for all! Then he expresses awe and amazement at the heavens, the sun and stars and planets. On and on, the ranks, With ever waiting, with the of the dead quickly fill'd, 50 the battle, defeat, yet and stopping, Pioneers! Was the road of late so toilsome? Yet a passing hour I yield you in your tracks to pause oblivious, Pioneers! Not for delectations sweet, Not the cushion and the slipper, not the peaceful and the studious, Not the riches safe and palling, not for us the tame enjoyment, Pioneers! Have the elder races halted? O you young and elder daughters! Still be ours the diet hard, and the blanket on the ground, Pioneers! Colorado men are we, From the peaks gigantic, from the great sierras and the high plateaus, From the mine and from the gully, from the hunting trail we come, Pioneers! O I and yet exult--I am rapt with love for all, Pioneers! We take up the task eternal, and the burden and the lesson, Pioneers! We take up the task eternal, and the burden, and the lesson, Pioneers! Do the feasters gluttonous feast? Do they droop and end their lesson, wearied over there beyond the seas? See, pioneering isn't about comforts, riches, or safety. O you youths, Western youths, So impatient, full of action, full of manly pride and friendship, Plain I see you Western youths, see you tramping with the foremost, Pioneers! O you young and elder daughters! I too with my soul and body, We, a curious trio, picking, wandering on our way, Through these shores amid the shadows, with the apparitions pressing, Pioneers! Raise the mighty mother mistress, Waving high the delicate mistress, over all the starry mistress, bend your heads all, Raise the fanged and warlike mistress, stern, impassive, weaponed mistress, Pioneers! Do the feasters gluttonous feast? Lo, the darting bowling orb! Then upon the march we fittest die, soon and sure the gap is fill'd, Pioneers! The DayPoems Poetry Collection , editor Click to submit poems to DayPoems, comment on DayPoems or a poem within, comment on other poetry sites, update links, or simply get in touch. Never must you be divided, in our ranks you move united, Pioneers! Are there some of us to droop and die? O to die advancing on! We primeval forests felling, We the rivers stemming, vexing we, and piercing deep the mines within; We the surface broad surveying, and the virgin soil upheaving, Pioneers! They chop down trees, dig mines, all kinds of stuff. As a whole, this poem represents Whitman's admiration of the pioneers who settled the western territories.

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Pioneers! O Pioneers! by Walt Whitman

walt whitman pioneers

E-Text: Leaves of Grass: Pioneers! O you mothers and you wives! He celebrates the natural landscape of the west, filled with rushing rivers, towering mountains, and sprawling prairies. O beloved race in all! Then upon the march we fittest die, soon and sure the gap is fill'd, Pioneers! Then upon the march we fittest die, soon and sure the gap is fill’d, Pioneers! Later in the poem, the speaker also acknowledges the danger that the pioneers will face - but he frames it as sacrifice. O you mothers and you wives! O my breast aches with tender love for all! Do they droop and end their lesson, wearied, over there beyond the seas? It is widely believed that these poems express his ideas of homosexual love. Colorado men are we, From the peaks gigantic, from the great sierras and the high plateaus, From the mine and from the gully, from the hunting trail we come, Pioneers! His most known works are from his epic collection of poetry Leaves of Grass which was first published in 1855 and was republished several times over the next four decades. Have the elder races halted? Still be ours the diet hard, and the blanket on the ground, Pioneers! O to die advancing on! All the past we leave behind; We debouch upon a newer, mightier world, varied world, Fresh and strong the world we seize, world of labor and the march, Pioneers! O you youths, Western youths, So impatient, full of action, full of manly pride and friendship, Plain I see you, Western youths, see you tramping with the foremost, Pioneers! We forests felling, We the stemming, we, and deep the mines within; We the broad surveying, we the soil upheaving, Pioneers! Comment on this poem, any poem, DayPoems, other poetry places or the art of poetry at.

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O Pioneers!

walt whitman pioneers

O you youths, youths, So impatient, full of action, full of pride and friendship, 10 I see you, youths, see you with the foremost, Pioneers! Poetry Whirl Indexes Poetry Places Nodes powered by Open Directory Project at dmoz. Minstrels latent on the prairies! O my breast aches with tender love for all! It still does not have a set rhyme scheme or meter, but it is organized into 26 quatrains 4-line stanzas. Shrouded bards of other lands, you may rest, you have done your work, Soon I hear you coming warbling, soon you rise and tramp amid us, Pioneers! On and on the compact ranks, With accessions ever waiting, with the places of the dead quickly fill'd, Through the battle, through defeat, moving yet and never stopping, Pioneers! Are there some of us to droop and die? I too with my soul and body, We, a curious trio, picking, wandering on our way, Through these shores amid the shadows, with the apparitions pressing, Pioneers! Raise the mighty mother mistress, Waving high the delicate mistress, over all the starry mistress bend your heads all , Raise the fang’d and warlike mistress, stern, impassive, weapon’d mistress, Pioneers! O you young and elder daughters! See my children, resolute children, By those swarms upon our rear we must never yield or falter, Ages back in ghostly millions frowning there behind us urging, Pioneers! It stops me every time. For we cannot tarry here, We must march, my darlings, we must bear the brunt of danger, We, the youthful sinewy races, all the rest on us depend. The work of pioneers, we're told, is primal, and our speaker thinks again of those to come, who will carry on the procession. O beloved race in all! I think the poem has some good things to say about youth and taking the plunge for the greatest adventure.

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O Pioneers!

walt whitman pioneers

O my breast aches with tender love for all! Shrouded bards of other lands!. From Nebraska, from Arkansas, Central inland race are we, from Missouri, with the continental blood interveined; All the hands of comrades clasping, all the Southern, all the Northern, Pioneers! We take up the task eternal, and the burden and the lesson, Pioneers! He tells us that all these varied men are comrades. We detachments steady throwing, Down the edges, through the passes, up the mountains steep, Conquering, holding, daring, venturing, as we go, the unknown ways, Pioneers! Not for delectations sweet; Not the cushion and the slipper, not the peaceful and the studious; Not the riches safe and palling, not for us the tame enjoyment, Pioneers! Still be ours the diet hard, and the blanket on the ground, Pioneers! O beloved race in all! See my children, resolute children, By those swarms upon our rear we must never yield or falter, Ages back in ghostly millions frowning there behind us urging, Pioneers! Plus, he urges that pioneers must always keep moving, never resting too long in one place. Then he gets listy on us. Till with sound of trumpet, Far, far off the daybreak call—hark! All the silent lovers, All the in the prisons, all the and the wicked, All the joyous, all the sorrowing, all the living, all the dying, Pioneers! In parts, he first examines the female and then the male body and praises their sacredness.


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O Pioneers!

walt whitman pioneers

Any requests for publication in other venues must be negotiated separately with the authors. The poet appears as a prophet — like Moses, he will lead the modern Israelites to a new Promised Land. Life’s involv’d and varied pageants, All the forms and shows, all the workmen at their work, All the seamen and the landsmen, all the masters with their slaves, Pioneers! From Nebraska, from Arkansas, inland race are we, from Missouri, with the blood intervein'd; All the of clasping, all the Southern, all the Northern, Pioneers! The poem also has several references to the American Civil War; and political and social issues of the time. Check out our other writing samples, like our resources on , ,. Read and set me on a path as a professional travel blogger. O beloved race in all! From Nebraska, from Arkansas, Central inland race are we, from Missouri, with the continental blood intervein'd, All the hands of comrades clasping, all the Southern, all the Northern, Pioneers! Are there some of us to droop and die? O to die advancing on! Shrouded bards of other lands! Minstrels latent on the prairies! We detachments steady throwing, Down the edges, through the passes, up the mountains steep, Conquering, holding, daring, venturing as we go the unknown ways, Pioneers! Are there some of us to droop and die? Our speaker lists all sorts of people in different social positions and jobs, good or bad, and seems to suggest that they are all unified, are all pioneers.

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Pioneers! O Pioneers!

walt whitman pioneers

All the pulses of the world, Falling in they beat for us, with the Western movement beat, Holding single or together, steady moving to the front, all for us, Pioneers! Shrouded bards of other lands, you may rest, you have done your work, Soon I hear you coming warbling, soon you rise and tramp amid us, Pioneers! This is the source of the first poetry placed on DayPoems. Colorado men are we, From the peaks gigantic, from the great sierras and the high plateaus, 30 From the mine and from the gully, from the hunting trail we come, Pioneers! We detachments steady throwing, Down the edges, through the passes, up the mountains steep, Conquering, holding, daring, venturing as we go the unknown ways, Pioneers! Do the corpulent sleepers sleep? Still be ours the diet hard, and the blanket on the ground, Pioneers! Shrouded bards of other lands! O to die advancing on! We take up the task eternal, and the burden, and the lesson, Pioneers! O you mothers and you wives! Yet a passing hour I yield you in your tracks to pause oblivious, Pioneers! O my breast aches with tender love for all! Do the corpulent sleepers sleep? To generalize and validate this post on my travel blog : exploring the unknown is an exciting and important adventure. Then upon the march we fittest die, soon and sure the gap is fill'd. Our speaker turns his attention to minstrels and bards. Then he tells this new race of pioneers us included to pick up where others across the Atlantic left off.

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Walt Whitman: Poems “Pioneers! O Pioneers!” Summary and Analysis

walt whitman pioneers

Excerpt:- I sing the body electric, The armies of those I love engirth me and I engirth them, They will not let me off till I go with them, respond to them, And discorrupt them, and charge them full with the charge of the soul. O you mothers and you wives! Do the corpulent sleepers sleep? O you young and elder daughters! Here are 10 of the most famous poems written by Whitman. He seems to include us, the readers, among the pioneers he is addressing. O cruel hands that hold me powerless—O helpless soul of me! Not for delectations sweet, Not the cushion and the slipper, not the peaceful and the studious, Not the riches safe and palling, not for us the tame enjoyment, Pioneers! O you mothers and you wives! Come, my tan-faced children, Follow well in order, get your weapons ready; Have you your pistols? For we cannot tarry here, We must march my darlings, we must bear the brunt of danger, We the youthful sinewy races, all the rest on us depend, Pioneers! All the hapless silent lovers, All the prisoners in the prisons, all the righteous and the wicked, All the joyous, all the sorrowing, all the living, all the dying, Pioneers! Colorado men are we, From the peaks gigantic, from the great sierras and the high plateaus, From the mine and from the gully, from the hunting trail we come, Pioneers! Lo, the brother orbs around, all the clustering suns and planets, All the dazzling days, all the mystic nights with dreams, Pioneers! Life's involved and varied pageants, All the forms and shows, all the workmen at their work, All the seamen and the landsmen, all the masters with their slaves, Pioneers, O pioneers! We detachments steady throwing, Down the edges, through the passes, up the mountains steep, Conquering, holding, daring, venturing as we go the unknown ways, Pioneers! The speaker frequently points out the pioneers' courage and emphasizes their importance in carving out a better future for themselves and all the generations to come. On and on the compact ranks, With accessions ever waiting, with the places of the dead quickly fill’d, Through the battle, through defeat, moving yet and never stopping, Pioneers! The poem symbolizes the awakening of a poet through nature. It's about hard work, risk, and sacrifice. O you young and elder daughters! Do they droop and end their lesson, wearied, over there beyond the seas? Not for delectations sweet; Not the cushion and the slipper, not the peaceful and the studious; 90 Not the riches safe and palling, not for us the tame enjoyment, Pioneers! O you daughters of the West! I too with my soul and body, We, a curious trio, picking, wandering on our way, Through these shores amid the shadows, with the apparitions pressing, Pioneers! I too with my soul and body, We, a trio, picking, on our way, 70 these shores, amid the shadows, with the apparitions pressing, Pioneers! O I mourn and yet exult—I am rapt with love for all, Pioneers! All the past we leave behind, We debouch upon a newer mightier world, varied world, Fresh and strong the world we seize, world of labor and the march, Pioneers! It's a good thing, then that he offers us an hour's rest.

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Pioneers! O Pioneers!

walt whitman pioneers

On and on, the compact ranks, With accessions ever waiting, with the places of the dead quickly filled, Through the battle, through defeat, moving yet and never stopping, Pioneers! The speaker points out the pioneers' youthful energy and reminds them that the future rests on their shoulders. Was the road of late so toilsome? I too with my soul and body, We, a curious trio, picking, wandering on our way, Through these shores, amid the shadows, with the apparitions pressing, Pioneers! See, my children, children, By swarms upon our rear, we must yield or falter, Ages back in millions, there us urging, Pioneers! O I mourn and yet exult--I am rapt with love for all, Pioneers! O you daughters of the West! Was the road of late so toilsome? Was the road of late so toilsome? O beloved race in all! In Whitman's time, the American west was being settled by people who were adventurous, willing to take risks and rise to unknown challenges, work hard at establishing the future expansion of this country. Shrouded bards of other lands, you may rest, you have done your work, Soon I hear you coming warbling, soon you rise and tramp amid us, Pioneers! Do they and end lesson, wearied, over beyond the seas? All the hapless silent lovers, All the prisoners in the prisons, all the righteous and the wicked, All the joyous, all the sorrowing, all the living, all the dying, Pioneers! He then asks if night has fallen, if things have been hard, if we have become discouraged. We take up the task eternal, and the burden, and the lesson, Pioneers! Throughout the poem, the speaker addresses the pioneers' innate restlessness. We primeval forests felling, We the rivers stemming, vexing we and piercing deep the mines within, We the surface broad surveying, we the virgin soil upheaving, Pioneers! Are some of us to and die? O you youths, Western youths, So impatient, full of action, full of manly pride and friendship, Plain I see you Western youths, see you tramping with the foremost, Pioneers! O beloved race in all! Do they droop and end their lesson, wearied over there beyond the seas? They are one of the primary reasons due to which he is considered homosexual by many people. Won't you help support DayPoems? But soon, the sound of trumpet at daybreak comes, and it is time, he tells us, to keep moving, to take our place in the army of pioneers.


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