Lucy gray william wordsworth poem. Lucy Gray [or Solitude] poem 2019-02-13

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Lucy Gray [or Solitude] poem

lucy gray william wordsworth poem

Here, the haunting idea is emphasized more and more that the child exists, even in death, as a part of nature; even her singing could be heard through the sound of the wind. Then downward from the steep hill's edge They track'd the footmarks small; And through the broken hawthorn-hedge, And by the long stone-wall; And then an open field they cross'd, The marks were still the same; They track'd them on, nor ever lost, And to the Bridge they came. He first listened to the story from his sister, Dorothy. At day-break on a hill they That the moor; And they saw the of wood, A from door. No Mate, no comrade Lucy knew; She dwelt on a wild Moor, The sweetest Thing that ever grew Beside a human door! Then from the hill's edge They the small; And the hawthorn hedge, And by the long stone-wall; And then an open they crossed: The were the same; They them on, nor ever lost; And to the they came. O'er rough and smooth she trips along, And never looks behind; And sings a solitary song That whistles in the wind. You yet may spy the fawn at play, The hare upon the green; But the face of Lucy Gray Will more be seen.

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Students4Students: Wordsworth`s Lucy Gray

lucy gray william wordsworth poem

This newfound love for country commits him to a decision to never step foot off the island nation again. Indeed, he began his poem and ended it by linking Lucy with nature. The came on its time: She up and down; And many a hill did Lucy climb: But reached the town. Thus, the poem talked about the same events; still, using his imagination, he tried to immortalize this little girl by merging, connecting, and attaching her with every part of nature. The wretched Parents all that night Went shouting far and wide; But there was neither sound nor sight To serve them for a guide. Lucy Gray is one of these natural objects whose description is delectable for Wordsworth. The storm came on before its time, She wander'd up and down, And many a hill did Lucy climb But never reach'd the Town.


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Lucy Gray [or Solitude] poem

lucy gray william wordsworth poem

This could mean that she is really innocent like nature. They from the bank Those footmarks, one by one, Into the of the plank; And there were none! In this poem, we, as readers, can hint two major romantic features: imagination and nature. The second romantic feature is nature which the little girl was united with. Thus, to him, she is immortalized through nature. They follow'd from the snowy bank The footmarks, one by one, Into the middle of the plank, And further there were none. These notes were contributed by members of the GradeSaver community. Thus, she is no longer lost since her spirit has been everywhere, so we can see her in every part of nature.

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Students4Students: Wordsworth`s Lucy Gray

lucy gray william wordsworth poem

Her footsteps were traced by her parents to the middle of the lock of a canal, and no other vestige of her, backward or forward, could be traced. Oft I had heard of Lucy Gray, And when I cross'd the Wild, I chanc'd to see at break of day The solitary Child. That is why she found difficulties while going to the touched nature, town, so she was lost in nature. From the very beginning of the poem, he tried to unite Lucy with the natural elements. He loved nature and natural objects in all its forms, and this love of nature led him to the love of humanity.

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Lucy Gray by William Wordsworth

lucy gray william wordsworth poem

Her presence on earth was short and isolated enough to impact few, but for the speaker nothing less than everything about his life is different due to her absence. GradeSaver, 23 September 2017 Web. The first romantic feature is imagination. You yet may spy the Fawn at play, The Hare upon the Green; But the sweet face of Lucy Gray Will never more be seen. You can help us out by revising, improving and updating this section.

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Lucy Gray by William Wordsworth

lucy gray william wordsworth poem

He has love and sympathy for this little girl because she is a source of inspiration, as well as nature, for the poet to compose this poem. No mate, no Lucy knew; She on a wide moor, --The thing that ever grew Beside a door! He is an excellent example of the self-medication through nature. And then, once Nature has perfected her, it steals her away from others through death. The parents all that Went far and wide; But was sound nor To them for a guide. O'er and she along, And looks behind; And a song That in the wind.


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Students4Students: Wordsworth`s Lucy Gray

lucy gray william wordsworth poem

Yet some maintain that to this day She is a living Child, That you may see sweet Lucy Gray Upon the lonesome Wild. Both of these features led to the immortalization of the little girl, Lucy Gray. The two important features in this poem are imagination, and nature. . This means that her soul exists in nature, and that he would remember her in every natural element around him. At day-break on a hill they stood That overlook'd the Moor; And thence they saw the Bridge of Wood A furlong from their door.

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Lucy Gray by William Wordsworth

lucy gray william wordsworth poem

An editor will review the submission and either publish your submission or provide feedback. Hence, Wordsworth is trying to pull this poem away from realism into a state dominated by his imagination. Then he recollected the ideas again in the form of this poem. Not is the roe: With many a stroke Her feet the snow, That up like smoke. We, as reader, can figure the romantic features out easily. Not blither is the mountain roe, With many a wanton stroke Her feet disperse, the powd'ry snow That rises up like smoke.

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Students4Students: Wordsworth`s Lucy Gray

lucy gray william wordsworth poem

Only in the final four lines of the last stanza does Lucy finally make an appearance and her memory is connected with the memory of England, his love of country and his fidelity to never stray. We are thankful of their contributions and encourage you to make your own. The speaker can seem either resigned to the inescapable realities of mortality or utter drained of the power to feel anything in light of the overwhelming loss. . .

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